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Can cancer be prevented?

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asked Mar 22, 2016 in Health and Fitness by benbailey (5,400 points)
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Getting cancer depends on a combination of aspects such as a person's genes, environmental, and lifestyle factors. Other than genes, the other factors can be easily controlled by an individual. Exposure to UV rays, cancer-causing chemicals, tobacco, and stress are some of the main factors that cause cancer. Most of these are under our direct control, and we can limit our exposure to them. Experts estimate that more than 4 in 10 cancer cases can be prevented with the proper lifestyle changes. Here are some of the most important things you can do to reduce the risk of cancer. Maintaining a healthy body weight, stop smoking, consuming a healthy and balanced diet, reduce your alcohol intake, enjoying the sun safely, avoiding cancer risks in the workplace, and being active.


References

http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/causes-of-cancer/can-cancer-be-prevented

http://www.cancer.org/cancer/breastcancer/overviewguide/breast-cancer-overview-prevention


answered Mar 23, 2016 by nilupa1973 (35,290 points)
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Cancer is not 100% preventable in all cases, but there are specific steps any individual can take to reduce or minimize chances of cancer:

1) Lifestyle adaptations: Certain lifestyle factors increase chances of cancer. Some are universally agreed upon, like reducing physical weight, abstaining from alcohol, not smoking, and protecting yourself from the sun. Others are possible or probable, but sometimes debatable, like certain foods you eat, i.e. red meats or processed foods. However, it is generally agreed that diet and exercise go a long way.

2) Get your check-ups: Routine physicals and age-advised screenings can often detect cancers or warning signs of cancers. Breast exams, colonoscopies, testicular examinations, and looking over your entire skin can find early signs of many common cancers so they can be nipped in the bud before they turn into serious problems.

3) Know your family history: Family history is not always an accurate predictor of cancer, but some kinds strike some families more than others. Incidents of colon cancer, for instance, that take place while someone is middle aged, means that descendants and relatives should probably get checked out earlier than the general population is advised to begin to.

4) Remove risky parts: This is much easier accomplished if examination schedules and guidelines are adhered to. A person with breast cancer might decide to have both breasts surgically removed and then replaced with implants in order to negate future risk. Someone with suspicious moles or atypical nevi on the skin can have them removed by a dermatologist to prevent any risk of melanoma.

[1]http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/in-depth/cancer-prevention/art-20044816

[2]http://www.mcancer.org/cancer-prevention

answered Mar 26, 2016 by Topher (27,830 points)

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